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MLB Bullets does what it wants to

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Baseball cracks down on foreign substances and is thinking about changing the pickoff rules. The Yankees move on without Luis Severino.

MLB: Colorado Rockies-Workouts
Nolan Arenado
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Earlier this week and a little over an hour up the road from me, Diana Serra Cary died. She was 101 years old. I didn’t know her personally and if you’ve never heard of her, that’s understandable. But once upon a time, she was among the most famous people in the world. In the early-1920s, she was “Baby Peggy,” one of the biggest child stars of the silent movie era. She was also called the “Million Dollar Baby” because she was making more than $1 million a year at age 4. Little girls got “Baby Peggy” dolls for Christmas. Like many of the child stars of that era, her money was all spent by her parents and what they didn’t spend, they lost in the stock market crash. By 14, she was washed-up, broke and on the dole.

Eventually she ran from her past, changed her name and intentionally faded into anonymity. She re-emerged in the 1970s as a writer and an historian of old Hollywood, which she knew first-hand. She was also an advocate for the rights of child performers throughout her life.

Serra Cary was the last living film star of the silent movie era. There are about a dozen other people who appeared in movies during the silent picture era still alive, but they were all extras or had small bit parts. Her death ends the last living link we had to that era of American culture.

Here’s a link to her film Captain January. Here’s TCM’s short tribute to her.

I’ve got fewer than ten articles left. I’m writing about whatever the heck I want. And I’m not writing about whatever I don’t want to write about. So here’s to you, Baby Peggy.

And tomorrow will be a better day than today, Buster. Maybe I’ll change my name to “Mason Saunders” now that Madison Bumgarner isn’t using it anymore.