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Baseball history unpacked, July 1

A thrice-weekly digest, replete with #Cubs, #MLB, and #MiLB factoids gathered from allegedly reputable sources. Today’s pictured hurler was a Cub only for a short while.

Colin Rea
Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, Bleed Cubbie Blue is pleased to present a light-hearted, Cubs-centric look at baseball’s colorful past, with plenty of the lore and various narratives to follow as they unfold over the course of time. Here’s a handy Cubs timeline, to help you follow along. We also include Cubs’ player birthdays and a bit of world history, for context.

Today in baseball history:

  • 1859 - In the first college baseball game ever played, Amherst defeats Williams College, 73-32 (66-32 by some reports) in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (2)
  • 1901 - Chicago 1B Jack Doyle, harassed by a Polo Grounds fan, jumps into the stands and hits him once with his left hand, reinjuring the hand which he had broken several weeks before. The Giants’ Dummy Taylor trims Chicago’s Jack Taylor, 6-4. (2)
  • 1906 - Righthander Jack Taylor, 8-9 with the St. Louis Cardinals, returns to the Cubs in exchange for second-string C Pete Noonan, rookie P Fred Beebe and cash. Taylor will help the Cubs by going 12-3 the rest of the year. (2)
  • 1910 - White Sox Park opens with a 2-0 loss to the Browns. The stadium, since called Comiskey Park, is baseball’s biggest and cost $750,000 to build. 24,900 attend the game, 1,100 less than capacity. This stadium will close in the fall of 1990, to be replaced by a new structure, which will be known initially as New Comiskey Park. (1,2)
  • 1911 - In a 3-0 Chicago win over the host Reds, Cubs player-manager Frank Chance leaves the game suffering from a blood clot in the brain. Except for 11 brief appearances at 1B over the next three years, his playing days are over. (2)
  • 1912 - At Pittsburgh, Chicago’s Wildfire Schulte breaks up a scoreless pitching duel between Marty O’Toole and Jimmy Lavender by legging out an inside-the-park homer in the 12th inning. Lavender and the Cubs win, 1-0. (2)
  • 1920 - Walter Johnson pitches his first no-hitter. An error by Bucky Harris costs him a perfect game, but Harris’ hit drives in Washington’s only run against the Red Sox at Fenway. The next day Johnson comes up with the first sore arm of his life and is useless for the rest of the year, finishing 8-10.
  • 1951 - Veteran Bob Feller pitches the third no-hitter of his career, tying the record of Cy Young and Larry Corcoran, as he beats Detroit’s Bob Cain, 2-1. Feller loses his shutout in the fourth when Johnny Lipon reaches on an error, swipes second base, goes to third on a errant pickoff, and scores on a sacrifice fly. Rookie Bob Chakales shuts out the Tigers in the nightcap, 2-0, for Cleveland’s 10th straight win over Detroit. Detroit has scored eight runs in the ten losses. (2)
  • 1958 - The Cubs’ Tony Taylor hits a ball inside the third base line that falls into the rain gutter in fair territory at Wrigley Field. San Francisco rookie OF Leon Wagner chases the ball, but is fooled by Cubs relief pitchers staring intently under the bench. Wagner does not look for the ball in the gutter 40 to 50 feet further down. Taylor reaches home on the hit. (2)
  • 1973 - At Wrigley Field, the Mets edge the Cubs, 6-5, in the first game of a doubleheader. Then it is the Cubs’ turn, as Randy Hundley bangs a ninth inning three-run homer to give Chicago the 6-5 edge. Ron Santo has seven hits for the afternoon, five in the nitecap. (2)
  • 2005 - After walking 2,100 miles from Camp Verde, Arizona to reach Wrigley Field, Bill Holden throws the ceremonial first pitch and leads the crowd in singing Take Me Out to the Ballgame during the 7th-inning stretch at the Cubs game against the Nationals. Inspired by the DVD, This Old Cub, a documentary about former Cubs All-Star third baseman Ron Santo who lost both his legs to diabetes, the 56-year-old school teacher, with two bad knees, pounds the pavement for 172 days and raises $250,000 with his ‘Walk the Walk’ campaign for juvenile diabetes research. (2)
  • 2019 - The Pirates beat down on the Cubs, with 23 hits in an 18-5 win. Josh Bell hits three homers and drives in seven runs, Adam Frazier has five hits including four doubles, matching the major league record, while Colin Moran also has a five-hit game. (2)

Cubs birthdays: John Clarkson HOF, Fred Holmes, Hersh Freeman, Frank Baumann, Dick Drott, Mike Montgomery, Colin Rea*. Also notable: Roger Connor HOF, Ben Taylor HOF.

Today in world history:

  • 1200 - In China, sunglasses are invented.
  • 1535 - Sir Thomas More goes on trial in England charged with treason.
  • 1776 - 1st vote on Declaration of Independence for Britain’s North American colonies.
  • 1847 - 1st US postage stamps go on sale, 5 cent Franklin and 10 cent Washington, NYC.
  • 1867 - The Dominion of Canada is formed, comprising the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Ontario & Quebec, with John A. Macdonald serving as the first Prime Minister.
  • 1898 - Theodore Roosevelt and his Rough Riders charge up San Juan Hill.
  • 1905 - Albert Einstein introduces his theory of special relativity.
  • 1934 - Brookfield Zoo opens near Chicago, Illinois.

Common sources:

*pictured.

There is a very active baseball history community and there are many facets to their views. We strive for clarity. Please be aware that we are trying to make the historical record as represented by our main sources coherent and as accurate as is possible. No item is posted here without corroboration. Some of these items spread from site to site without being verified. That is exactly why we ask for reputable sources, so that we can address them to the originators. BBRef is very cooperative in this regard, as are SABR and the Baseball Almanac. We have removed thenationalpastime from our sourcing list, as there have been multiple complaints about their content and they do not respond to attempts to communicate.

Also please remember that this is supposed to be fun.

Thank you for your cooperation. And thanks for reading!